New Relic Wallboard

New Relic is a very good tool to monitor you servers and applications with a bunch of metrics och features. If you landed on this page you probably already use it so I want go into any more details on it. There are things I love about it and things I hate about it, the way it is with most tools you come across in your day to day work.

For monitoring we use the Health Map filtered to Hosts and related applications which gives us a great overview of the overall condition of the servers and the web applications running on them. Currently there is no customization for the sorting or the layout and no kiosk mode for a proper wallboard. When building a good wallboard for your support or NOC you want to add additional information and be conservative with the real estate, you want to fit all the information on one big screen so you get all the information you need in one glance. This is where New Relic doesn’t deliver as good as it does on other parts.

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Raspberry Pi: Ubiquiti UniFi Controller

You can use Unifi Controller from your computer to configure and monitor your Ubiquiti access points but a cloud key is much nicer. The Unifi Cloud Key is basically just an ARM computer running of an SD-card. Sound familiar? So what’s the difference between that and a Raspberry Pi? Not much besides memory and price. It more or less costs three times as much and the extra memory is not necessary for a small office or home installation. The Unifi Controller doesn’t only take care of your access points but also firewall and switches if you use Unifi gear. In my case I have a Ubiquiti Edge Router X as a firewall and that doesn’t play with the Unifi Controller. At the same time it has a very nice UI as is and have 5 separate ports for different LAN’s while the entry firewall for Unify has 3 where one is WAN and one is for voip. In this article I describe how to setup Unifi Controller on a Raspberry Pi, provision the AP and then keep the Unifi Controller in a different subnet from the WLAN. I also show how to setup a guest wifi on a separate subnet.

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RaspberryPI: Print server

The goal for this build was to create a print server for my Brother HL-110 and Dymo LabelWriter 450 that could be used by both Mac and Windows. It turned out to be more tricky then I expected! After some research, testing and re-installs I came up with a solution that worked. It involves compiling drivers, setting up CUPS and samba to get all the parts to work properly.

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Raspbian Jessie: Set a static IP-address

For many of my projects on the Raspberry Pi a static, or fixed, IP-address has been needed. Here is a quick tutorial on how to set it up. This is aimed for SSH users who have no GUI on there Pi. Before you configured this by editing the network interfaces config file but not any more. Raspbian Jessie comes with dhcpcd5 by default and you can uninstall it it’s just easier to append to it’s configuration. Start by opening it’s configuration.

sudo nano /etc/dhcpcd.conf

dhcpcd.conf

At the end of this line you can add a static IP-address configuration. Here is an example:

#static ip
interface eth0
static ip_address=192.168.0.3/24
static routers=192.168.0.1
static domain_name_servers=8.8.8.8 8.8.4.4

First we specify the interface eth0 then all options follows with the prefix static. Ip address is specified with subnet, /24 is the equivalent of a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0. We also specify the networks default gateway for all traffic that will leave the network. In most cases this is your router for home built projects. We also need some DNS servers so we can use FQDN instead of just ip addresses when we communicate. In this example I have used the two Google DNS servers.