Unifi Controller Docker backup

Currently running my Unifi Controller as a docker container which works great. If you ever ended up with a broken Unifi Controller or Cloud Key you know the hassle it is to re-adopt and re-provision all your network gear to get back to square one. You should really keep track of the automatic backups from Unifi.

I’m using ryansch/unifi-rpi container which has more then 10 million pulls on docker hub. There isn’t any information about handeling backups in the description which surprises me! It is however a pretty easy thing to setup properly. Since I’m running my Unifi Controller in docker on a Raspberry Pi Docker Swarm my biggest fear is to fry the SD card. If I fry the SD card on the docker node it will also fry the automatic backups the unifi controller writes to disk.

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MySQL on Docker Swarm

For several applications around the house, I need a MySQL backend. The biggest database I run is about 60Mb of data for my Kodi media players. By using centralized storage like this I only need to update one of them when I add new media. Also convenient if I watch a movie in the living room, pause it, and then want to continue in the bedroom. A few years ago we actually did this with our apartment in San Francisco and our other apartment in Sweden. So this has been battle-proven over the years for me.

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Raspberry Pi Docker Swarm

For small home server applications like Hassio, Plex and headless BitTorrent boxes Raspberry Pi has been a great solution for years. I came to a point where I was running several ones with different software on it depending on it’s intended use. This, however, isn’t ideal for a number of reasons. Even though Raspberry Pis are cheap you usually end up underutilizing the hardware. So we could be running more stuff on the same hardware. The second issue is the setup, I have done numerous posts about setting up different systems and how to maintain them.

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reCAPTCHA v2 vs reCAPTCHA v3

CAPTCHA was first invented in 1997 to distinguish a human from a bot performing an action. Back in the day captchas were usually obscured or deformed letters. Before that, we had the simple question verification like “what is 1 + 9” which is simple enough once the bot scrapes it off the page.

In 2007 reCAPTCHA was originally launched and then acquired by Google in 2009. The new thing with reCAPTCHA is that the work effort used to prove you’re a human isn’t wasted. Initially, reCAPTCHA was used in the digitalization of the New York Times and Google Books archive. By presenting the user with images where the OCR had failed you got a human interpretation to add to the OCR results. By combining known and unknown images you could still be confirmed as a human while providing this service.

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Dealing with credentials in PowerShell

Whenever you write PowerShell scripts that are going to be used for automation you need to secure your credentials. The best practice is to use a service account to execute the PowerShell script and delegate whatever privileges it needs to execute. When dealing with internal systems and resources that are usually pretty easy if they all authenticate from the same ecosystem or are integrated properly. But there is instances where you need to store credentials like when working with external APIs or deattached internal system.

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